The most important thing is to have conceptual clarity as to why a geiger counter is being used to shape the music. Perhaps the piece is about nuclear power or nuclear weapons. Perhaps this kind of probabilistic distribution has a certain feel or aesthetic that is interesting without a more abstract layer of meaning. Any number of reasons I suppose. But it’s important to be clear on motivation because that will temper how you actually put the geiger counter to use.

In terms of expected results you can look at it at least two ways.

First would be the time between detection events, ie “clicks." The most obvious thing would be to simply sound a note each time there is a click. This could be automated using a modular synth triggering with each (input) click. The time between clicks will have an exponential distribution, and that will have an intuitive feel.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exponential_distribution#Applications_of_exponential_distribution

Second would be to count how many clicks there are in each time interval, and then map that number into some audible result.  For example, in each measure you could count the number of clicks, and then in the following measure have that many players play. Or you could measure a series of click counts in advance, and then use those in sequence to create a musical score. The number of clicks per time interval will have a poisson distribution, and will also have an intuitive feel.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poisson_distribution#Occurrence

I was able to find a number of actual examples by googling "music triggered by geiger counter clicks”

Phil

On Jul 23, 2018, at 2:38 AM, Tim B <tim@timesup.org> wrote:


Hello Eu Gene People,

I have not followed this complete thread, but a related issue has arisen in a recent request for a music piece. The request is to create a guide/composition for an improv ensemble that will be guided by quantum effects. As I understand it, the effect will be pulses from a Geiger counter. So the "random" input is a series of pulses at various time steps, with unpredictable time intervals. I would be interested in any references people have to generative works that are driven by such a randomness. Any and all suggestions and leads welcome, especially with motivational comments. There is a bit of material out there, but working out how much is relevant and how much is borderline esoteric nonsense is a bit hard...

Best wishes,

Tim



On 2018-07-14 21:57, Alan Dorin via eu-gene wrote:
Hi Mae,

I am travelling right now and don’t have access to the proper PDF files, but you can download versions of both papers here from my home page:


If you want other versions of the final papers, please let me know in the middle of next week and I will fwd them.

Thanks for your interest!
Alan

Sent from my iPad

On 11 Jul 2018, at 9:43 pm, Mae Leong via eu-gene <eu-gene@we.lurk.org> wrote:

Hello Alan,

Your paper seems interesting. I'm doing research on Evolutionary Art for my MSc thesis. Is there any way I can download a copy of the paper? Do you post in on ResearchGate?

Mae 


On Wed, Jul 11, 2018 at 6:44 AM, Alan Dorin via eu-gene
_______________________________________________
eu-gene mailing list -- eu-gene@we.lurk.org
To unsubscribe send an email to eu-gene-leave@we.lurk.org
<Untitled>
_______________________________________________
eu-gene mailing list -- eu-gene@we.lurk.org
To unsubscribe send an email to eu-gene-leave@we.lurk.org


_______________________________________________
eu-gene mailing list -- eu-gene@we.lurk.org
To unsubscribe send an email to eu-gene-leave@we.lurk.org

-- 
Tim Boykett               Time's Up              ⌛
tim@timesup.org           http://timesup.org
(Austria) 0664 5466 566   (Australia) 0476 279 424
_______________________________________________
eu-gene mailing list -- eu-gene@we.lurk.org
To unsubscribe send an email to eu-gene-leave@we.lurk.org